Tag Archives: toys

Am I a Christmas Grinch?

christmas-gifts
Growing up to immigrant parents who worked about 12 hours a day, 6 days a week, we didn’t partake in all the Christmas and Santa traditions that many of my peers followed. We had a Christmas tree up, decorations around the house and we got gifts. We would get a gift from our parents and gifts from some relatives. I think the gift count stood at like four or five gifts. This was amazing! Four or five gifts all on one day is A LOT! Isn’t it?

I’ve been hearing some parents say that they’re trying to LIMIT themselves to ONLY buying four gifts, not including some smaller gifts as stocking stuffers. This is on top of the piles of gifts that the grandparents, relatives and friends will be buying the kids. I wonder where do all these toys go because I’m sure the kids receive plenty of toys on their birthday as well as toys they might receive throughout the year.

Apparently, the latest craze in the toy world this year is some hatching bird toy called the Hatchimal. There have been stories of parents searching high and low for the toy and stalking other customers who had bought the last Hatchimal to their cars offering double the price that was paid. It’s available on Amazon for about three times the original price of $60, which I’m sure many are more than willing to pay. Parents who are unable to buy the Hatchimal have resorted to writing apology letters to their children from Santa Claus to explain why there will be no Hatchimal underneath the Christmas tree.

Recently, a co-worker asked me if I had given my toddler the Toys R Us catalog so that he could create his Christmas list. Um, nope! When someone asked my son what was on his list, he answered, “I don’t know.” Maybe when he gets older, I won’t be able to avoid this but as of now, he still hasn’t grasped the concept of Christmas meaning new toys and that he should make a Christmas wish list. I’d like to keep it that way for now. Plus, I think a wish list is just a recipe for disappointment if they don’t get what they asked for. Another person told me that telling your child that they may not get the Christmas presents they want if they don’t behave is a great tool to get your kids to do what you want, but shouldn’t they be good for “goodness’ sake.”

Some might be shaking their heads, thinking my poor child is deprived. I assure you he isn’t. He has plenty of toys to play with. He’s got trains, train tracks, cars, blocks (different types), Legos, a box of arts and crafts stuff, a play kitchen, puzzles, and dried beans. Huh? Did I say dried beans? Yes, dried beans. He has entertained himself with his beach toys pretending that the dried beans are sand. Yes, it’s cold here in the northeast and I guess he’s reminiscing about the summertime. Sometimes he puts the beans into his toy dump truck pretending it’s picking up dirt. When he was younger, he was more interested in playing with the box that the toys came rather the toy itself. And now that he’s an older brother, he plays with the baby’s toys too. He doesn’t discriminate against any toy…he’s an equal opportunity toy player.
puzzle

As much as us adults think that the expensive battery operated toys that makes sounds and moves are cooler, sometimes simple is better. I’m sure I’ll be accused of being cheap, but while that is a plus of buying simpler toys, it is not the main factor. The simple toys requires the child to use his or her imagination. My son will get excited with the battery operated toys that makes sounds and moves, but doesn’t play with them for long and eventually loses interest. With the simpler toys like the blocks, I see him building different things every time he plays with it and creating different storylines with them. Also, more is not always better. Research has shown that having too many toys may cause your child to be overwhelmed.

My wife and I will get A present for each of our two kids. They will also get gifts from the grandparents, aunts, uncle and close friends. And I am sure my older son will be excited opening his gifts on Christmas morning. Honestly, I don’t remember all that much about what gifts I received growing up, but I do remember Christmas day as a day my parents did not have to go to work and that we would have dinner with our extended family where I would play with my cousins with the new toys we got. I’d like to think that my kids will get the same amount of excitement from unwrapping Christmas gifts as they will spending time with their extended family.

Related post: How I was shamed for my frugality when I didn’t get something from Tiffany’s for my wife one Christmas. Update: My wife and I do exchange gifts but it’s usually something simple, something practical, something we made, or maybe we’ll go out to eat or some other activity. I would never buy something from Tiffany’s since we would talk to each other about such an expensive purchase first. And as a frugal person herself, she would not want me to spend that money. That year I was shamed. This year I was called a Scrooge!

What Christmas traditions did you grow up with? How many gifts are too many for kids?